Top 9 Smartphone Battery Myths You Should Stop Believing
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You should stop believing in smartphone battery myths as it can be frustrating when your smartphone battery dies at the most inopportune times. Whether we’re in the middle of an important phone call or trying to capture that perfect photo, a dead battery always seems to get in the way. In an effort to prolong our battery life, we’ve all taken measures such as reducing screen brightness, closing unused apps, and even not charging our phones to 100%. 

But are these really effective? It turns out, there are a lot of battery myths floating around that aren’t doing us any favors. In this article, we’ll debunk 10 of the most common smartphone battery myths so you can optimize your phone’s battery life once and for all.

Top 9 Smartphone Battery Myths You Should Stop Believing

1. Smartphone batteries don’t last as long as they used to

It seems like every year, our smartphones get more and more powerful. But battery life doesn’t seem to be keeping up. Why is this?

Well, there are a few reasons. First of all, our phones are doing more than ever before. We’re streaming video, browsing the web, checking social media, and playing games – all of which require a lot of power.

Secondly, phone manufacturers are packing in ever-more-powerful processors and more features, which also eat up battery life.

And finally, as phone screens have gotten bigger and brighter over the years, that’s also taken a toll on battery life.

So what can you do to improve your smartphone’s battery life? Well, there are a few things. First, make sure you’re only using apps that you really need – each app that’s running in the background uses up valuable battery power.

You can also adjust your screen brightness to help conserve power. And if you really want to give your battery a boost, consider investing in an external battery pack or portable charger.

2. You should let your smartphone battery drain completely before recharging it

It’s a common misconception that you should let your smartphone battery drain completely before recharging it. However, this is not the case. In fact, letting your battery drain completely can actually be detrimental to your phone’s battery life.

When a battery is completely drained, it’s more likely to suffer from what’s known as “deep discharge cycling.” This is when the battery is regularly cycled between being fully charged and fully discharged, which can cause long-term damage.

So, what should you do instead? It’s actually best to keep your battery somewhere between 40-80% charged. This will help prolong its overall lifespan.

3. Overcharging your smartphone battery will damage it

It’s a common myth that overcharging your smartphone battery will damage it. However, this is not the case. Overcharging your battery will not damage it, but it will shorten its lifespan. When you overcharge your battery, the chemicals inside of it break down and become less effective. This process is called “plating.” Plating can cause your battery to swell and eventually burst. So, while overcharging your battery won’t damage it, it’s not something you should do on a regular basis.

4. It’s better to charge your smartphone overnight

It’s no secret that smartphones have a tendency to lose battery power quickly. In fact, it’s one of the most common complaints about these devices. And while there are a number of ways to help prolong your phone’s battery life, one of the best things you can do is charge it overnight.

Sure, you might not get a full charge by morning, but topping off your phone before bed will help ensure that it’s charged and ready to go when you need it. Additionally, charging your phone overnight will help offset any power drain that might occur while you’re using it during the day.

So if you’re looking for a way to help extend your smartphone’s battery life, make sure to charge it overnight. It may not be a full charge, but it’ll be enough to keep your phone going throughout the day.

5. You should only use official chargers for your smartphone

Many people believe that using unofficial chargers will damage their smartphone batteries. However, this is not the case. Unofficial chargers are just as safe to use as official ones. The only difference is that official chargers tend to be more expensive.

6. You should avoid using your smartphone while it’s charging

Another common myth is that you should avoid using your smartphone while it’s charging. However, this is not true. Using your phone while it’s charging will not damage the battery or shorten its lifespan.

7.  You should let your smartphone battery drain completely before recharging it

This myth probably exists because people used to think that NiCd batteries (which are no longer used in smartphones) needed to be completely drained before being recharged. However, this is not the case with modern lithium-ion batteries. In fact, it’s actually better for the battery if you regularly recharge it before it reaches 0%.

8. You shouldn’t use your phone while it’s charging

It’s a common belief that you shouldn’t use your phone while it’s charging, but this is actually a myth! Using your phone while it’s charging won’t damage the battery or cause any problems. However, you should avoid using your phone if the battery is low and needs to charge for a long time. If you must use your phone while it’s charging, be sure to unplug it before going to bed so that the battery doesn’t overcharge.

9. Charging your phone in airplane mode will preserve its battery life

When you’re trying to conserve your phone’s battery life, one of the first things you’re probably told is to put it on airplane mode. And it makes sense—after all, turning off all those extra features and connections has got to save some power, right?

Well, it turns out that this particular battery-saving tip may not be as effective as you think. In fact, according to a study by Which? leaving your phone on airplane mode while charging can actually use up more battery in the long run.

So why does this happen? It all has to do with how your phone charges. When you plug your phone into a power source, it starts drawing an electrical current. This current is used to charge the battery and also powers the phone’s internal components.

Now, when you put your phone in airplane mode, it cuts off that electrical current and instead relies on the battery to power the internal components. This means that the battery has to work harder, which can lead to a shorter lifespan and reduced capacity over time.

So while putting your phone in airplane mode may help preserve its battery life in the short term, it could actually end up doing more harm than good in the long run.

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